simulate


simulate
[[t]sɪ̱mjʊleɪt[/t]]
simulates, simulating, simulated
1) VERB If you simulate an action or a feeling, you pretend that you are doing it or feeling it.

[V n] They rolled about on the Gilligan Road, simulating a bloodthirsty fight...

[V-ed] He performed a simulated striptease.

2) VERB If you simulate an object, a substance, or a noise, you produce something that looks or sounds like it.

[V n] The wood had been painted to simulate stone...

[V n] Smoke was used to simulate steam coming from a smashed radiator...

[V n] Cadets are having to use football rattles to simulate gunfire because blank ammunition is too costly.

3) VERB If you simulate a set of conditions, you create them artificially, for example in order to conduct an experiment.

[V n] The scientist developed one model to simulate a full year of the globe's climate...

[V-ed] Cars are tested to see how much damage they suffer in simulated crashes.


English dictionary. 2008.

Synonyms:

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  • simulate — sim·u·late / sim yə ˌlāt/ vt lat·ed, lat·ing in the civil law of Louisiana: to make or carry out in a manner that does not express one s true intent a simulated sale of the debtor s property in which no consideration was paid Merriam Webster’s… …   Law dictionary

  • simulate — [sim′yo͞o lāt΄, sim′yəlāt΄] vt. simulated, simulating [< L simulatus, pp. of simulare, to feign < simul, together with, at the same time: see SAME] 1. to give a false indication or appearance of; pretend; feign [to simulate an interest] 2.… …   English World dictionary

  • Simulate — Sim u*late, a. [L. simulatus, p. p. of simulare to simulate; akin to simul at the same time, together, similis like. See {Similar}, and cf. {Dissemble}, {Semblance}.] Feigned; pretended. Bale. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Simulate — Sim u*late, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Simulated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Simulating}.] To assume the mere appearance of, without the reality; to assume the signs or indications of, falsely; to counterfeit; to feign. [1913 Webster] The Puritans, even in the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • simulate — (v.) 1620s (implied in simulated), from L. simulatus, pp. of simulare (see SIMULATION (Cf. simulation)). First record of simulated in sense of imitative for purposes of experiment or training is from 1966 (simulation in this sense dates from… …   Etymology dictionary

  • simulate — feign, counterfeit, sham, pretend, *assume, affect Analogous words: dissemble, *disguise, cloak, mask, camouflage: ape, mock, mimic, imitate, *copy …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • simulate — [v] pretend, imitate act, act like, affect, ape, assume, bluff, borrow, cheat, concoct, copy, counterfeit, crib*, deceive, disguise, dissemble, do, do a take off*, do like*, equivocate, exaggerate, fabricate, fake, favor, feature, feign, fence,… …   New thesaurus

  • simulate — ► VERB ▪ imitate or reproduce the appearance, character, or conditions of. DERIVATIVES simulant noun simulation noun. ORIGIN Latin simulare copy, represent …   English terms dictionary

  • simulate — 01. Wind tunnels [simulate] the conditions a vehicle will encounter when it moves through the air. 02. Warning: This movie contains scenes of [simulated] sex. 03. Using virtual reality, doctors can experiment with new procedures on [simulated]… …   Grammatical examples in English

  • simulate — simulation sim‧u‧la‧tion [ˌsɪmjˈleɪʆn] noun [countable, uncountable] an activity or situation that produces conditions which are not real, but have the appearance of being real, used especially for testing something: • A computer simulation… …   Financial and business terms